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Bodybuilding.com fitness and bodybuilding fan website notified its customers of a security breach detected during February 2019 which was the direct result of a phishing email received back in July 2018. As detailed in the data incident notification published on the company's help center, the security breach might "have affected certain customer information in our possession" and, as concluded after investigating the incident with the help of "external forensic consultants that specialize in cyber-attacks," Bodybuilding.com says that it "could not rule out that personal information may have been accessed." The company also stated that there were no full debit or credit card numbers impacted in the security breach because it only stores only the last four digits and only for customers who opted to have their cards stored with their account information. While there is no conclusive evidence that customers' personal information has been accessed by the attackers in the security breach, in the eventuality that it did happen a potential data breach would include customers' "name, email address, billing/shipping addresses, phone number, order history, any communications with Bodybuilding.com, birthdate, and any information included in your BodySpace profile." Follow this on OUR FORUM.

Intel has released a new version of its DCH graphics driver for Windows 10, bringing the version number up to 26.20.100.6709. The biggest highlight of the new release is initial support for the Windows 10 May 2019 Update, which is scheduled to be released to the general public next month. This means the driver is now compliant with the Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM) 2.6, and it supports the DirectX 12 Shader Model 6.4 compiler on seventh-generation Intel Core processors or newer, or those with Intel HD Graphics 610 or higher. The driver also comes with the new Intel Graphics Command Center, the completely redesigned management app that Intel introduced a few weeks ago. This is still in early access, but it has seemingly replaced the old Graphics Control Panel nonetheless. The new app follows some of the design guidelines of Windows 10, and it aims to generally simplify the experience for those trying to change visual settings on their computer. Aside from that, there's not a ton that's new in this update, though it should bring some power savings improvements to integrated displays. In addition to the WDDM compliance and improved DirectX 12 support, developers can look forward to PSO cache for Compute Shaders support and improved performance for Direct3D 12 MetaCommands in DirectML. We have more plus the download link posted on OUR FORUM.

Sets were going to bring tabs to File Explorer and other Windows applications. An early version of Sets once appeared in Windows Insider builds, but Microsoft pulled it. Now, according to Microsoft’s Rich Turner on Twitter, Sets is “no more.” We were really looking forward to Sets, as we’ve always wanted tabs in the File Explorer as well as console windows like the Command Prompt, PowerShell, and even Linux Bash shells on Windows. Tabs in other applications like Notepad would be really cool, too. Sets offered native tabs any application could use. Here’s how Sets worked when it was available in Windows Insider builds for a short time a year ago. Back in June 2018, Microsoft removed Sets tabs from the Windows Insider build and thanked users for their “valuable feedback… as we develop this feature helping to ensure we deliver the best possible experience once it’s ready for release.” Microsoft has been pretty quiet about Sets ever since. In December 2018, Windows Central’s Zac Bowden claimed Sets wasn’t “canceled” according to his sources at Microsoft. But, five months later, Sets is looking pretty canceled. In response to a question about when a tabbed console environment would arrive, Microsoft’s Rich Turner said: “the Shell-provided tab experience is no more”—he’s referring to Sets. Turner also said, “adding tabs [to the console] is high on our to-do list.” Surely Microsoft wouldn’t be working on adding tabs to the console if those native operating system tabs were still their way any time soon. Get caught up on OUR FORUM.

After seven years of development, Super Mario Bros. has been ported from the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) to the Commodore 64. According to developer ZeroPaige, they have been working on this implementation for seven years and have been able to create an almost perfect C64 port Super Mario Bros. as it appeared for the NES in 1985. "This is a Commodore 64 port of the 1985 game SUPER MARIO BROS. for the Famicom and Nintendo Entertainment System,' stated in a post to the Lemon64 forum. "It contains the original version that was released in Japan and United States, as well as the European version. It also detects and supports a handful of turbo functionalities, and has 2 SID support." ZeroPaige has released the port as a C64 disk image file that can be used directly on the Commodore 64 console or through C64 emulators.  Below is a picture of the Super Mario Bros. port being played using the VICE C64 emulator. While most users have stated that the game is an almost perfect reproduction, some issues have been reported such as minor lag at times, music running a faster than the game, fireballs not traversing screens, or jumping suddenly no longer working. ZeroPaige explains what causes each of these bugs and that some of them may be tied to the emulator or joystick being used. BleepingComputer has reached out to ZeroPaige to find out if they have been contacted by Nintendo regarding this release, but we have not had a reply at the time of this publication. Follow this and more on OUR FORUM.

Some Microsoft employees are openly questioning whether diversity is important, in a lengthy discussion on an internal online messaging board meant for communicating with CEO Satya Nadella. Two posts on the board criticizing Microsoft diversity initiatives as “discriminatory hiring” and suggesting that women are less suited for engineering roles have elicited more than 800 comments, both affirming and criticizing the viewpoints, multiple Microsoft employees have told Quartz. The posts were written by a female Microsoft program manager. Quartz reached out to her directly for comment and isn’t making her name public at this point, pending her response. “Does Microsoft have any plans to end the current policy that financially incentivizes discriminatory hiring practices? To be clear, I am referring to the fact that senior leadership is awarded more money if they discriminate against Asians and white men,” read the original post by the Microsoft program manager on Yammer, a corporate messaging platform owned by Microsoft. The employee commented consistently throughout the thread, making similar arguments. Quartz reviewed lengthy sections of the internal discussion provided by Microsoft employees. “I have an ever-increasing file of white male Microsoft employees who have faced outright and overt discrimination because they had the misfortune of being born both white and male. This is unacceptable,” the program manager wrote in a comment later. The Microsoft employees who spoke to Quartz said they weren’t aware of any action by the company in response, despite the comments being reported to Microsoft’s human resources department. Full details posted on OUR FORUM.

Broadcom WiFi chipset drivers have been found to contain vulnerabilities impacting multiple operating systems and allowing potential attackers to remotely execute arbitrary code and to trigger denial-of-service according to a DHS/CISA alert and a CERT/CC vulnerability note. Quarkslab's intern Hugues Anguelkov was the one who reported five vulnerabilities he found in the "Broadcom wl driver and the open-source brcmfmac driver for Broadcom WiFi chipsets" while reversing engineering and fuzzing Broadcom WiFi chips firmware. As he discovered, "The Broadcom wl driver is vulnerable to two heap buffer overflows, and the open-source brcmfmac driver is vulnerable to a frame validation bypass and a heap buffer overflow." The Common Weakness Enumeration database describes heap buffer overflows in the CWE-122 entry, stating that they can lead to system crashes or the impacted software going into an infinite loop, while also allowing attackers "to execute arbitrary code, which is usually outside the scope of a program's implicit security policy" and bypassing security services. As the CERT/CC vulnerability note written by Trent Novelly explains, potential remote and unauthenticated attackers could exploit the Broadcom WiFi chipset driver vulnerabilities by sending maliciously-crafted WiFi packets to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable machines. However, as further detailed by Novelly, "More typically, these vulnerabilities will result in denial-of-service attacks." Learn more by visiting OUR FORUM.

 

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